Um Louco Apaixonado

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

Want more writerly content? Make sure to follow maxkirin.tumblr.com for your daily dose of writer positivity, advice, and prompts!

that-angle-of-refraction-though:

The movement of a single particle in an Ocean wave

that-angle-of-refraction-though:

The movement of a single particle in an Ocean wave

coolthingsswd:

Ode to Apollo 11 and the joy of discovery

bbsrc:

Bloodsucking mite threatens UK honey bees
This is an image of a Varroa mite in a beehive.
Scientists have discovered how this bloodsucking parasite has transformed Deformed Wing Virus (DWV) into one of the biggest threats facing UK honeybees.
Honeybees are a key pollinating insect, adding around $40Bn globally to crop value. Over recent years the spread of parasites and the viruses they transmit has resulted in high overwintering colony losses.
New and emerging threats to insect pollinators are putting increasing pressure on the agricultural sector to meet the demands of a growing population.
DWV is one of the most common viruses infecting European honeybees. Although present in almost all colonies, high levels of deformed wing disease – characterised by developmental deformities, reduced foraging ability and longevity – are only common when Varroa is also present.
Researchers at the University of Warwick have discovered how the disease is amplified in the presence of Varroa destructor, a tiny parasitic mite invading hives across the globe.
Read more on this story: http://bit.ly/1qZtRaQ
For more bee related news: http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bquwSmky
Image by Giles San Martin

bbsrc:

Bloodsucking mite threatens UK honey bees

This is an image of a Varroa mite in a beehive.

Scientists have discovered how this bloodsucking parasite has transformed Deformed Wing Virus (DWV) into one of the biggest threats facing UK honeybees.

Honeybees are a key pollinating insect, adding around $40Bn globally to crop value. Over recent years the spread of parasites and the viruses they transmit has resulted in high overwintering colony losses.

New and emerging threats to insect pollinators are putting increasing pressure on the agricultural sector to meet the demands of a growing population.

DWV is one of the most common viruses infecting European honeybees. Although present in almost all colonies, high levels of deformed wing disease – characterised by developmental deformities, reduced foraging ability and longevity – are only common when Varroa is also present.

Researchers at the University of Warwick have discovered how the disease is amplified in the presence of Varroa destructor, a tiny parasitic mite invading hives across the globe.

Read more on this story: http://bit.ly/1qZtRaQ

For more bee related news: http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bquwSmky

Image by Giles San Martin

Fission (“splitting”) occurs when the nucleus of large, unstable atoms, like uranium and plutonium, break into smaller atoms, releasing energetic radiation and neutrons. Fission powers the “atomic” bomb that destroyed Hiroshima, and all nuclear power reactors.

Fusion (“joining”) occurs when light atoms, primarily isotopes of hydrogen, fuse into larger atoms, releasing fantastic quantities of energy. Fusion powers the sun and “hydrogen” bombs, which are called “thermonuclear” for the intense heat needed to overcome electrical repulsion between positively-charged hydrogen nuclei. Fusion, however, is extremely difficult to control; although billions have been spent to tame fusion for electricity, practical reactors are decades away. 

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Gravity wells - 

A Gravity well or gravitational well is defined as “a conceptual model of the gravitational field surrounding a body in space.”

The more massive the body, the deeper and more extensive the gravity well associated with it. The Sun is very massive, relative to other bodies in the Solar System, so its gravity well appears “deep” and far-reaching.

(picture a very heavy object sinking deep into a bed mattress; the more mass the object has the deeper it sinks in and creates a deeper sinkhole; a deeper sink hole will pull in any nearby objects towards the centre object with greater influence. Objects of  mass bend the fabric of spacetime this way also as the theory of general relativity explains) 

a video example

science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 

[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!

The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?

Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.

Read the full article by Ethan Siegel